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| Evident Change

SafeMeasures® is a full-agency data solution to social service case management. Real-time analyses offer current reports on every client served by your agency. From line staff to administrators, SafeMeasures provides tools for staff in every role to do their jobs well.

| Chris Scharenbroch | Kathy Park | Kristen Johnson, PhD

There is currently great interest in the child welfare field in using predictive analytics, spurred on by "big data," to help children and families. But how do we mitigate the risks? In this report, Evident Change lays out principles for product development, evaluation, and practice to use predictive analytics responsibly and successfully.

| NCCD

SafeMeasures® expansion to NYC and new blog series highlight this month’s NCCD News. *This link opens slowly; please be patient.

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

This issue of the newsletter includes: a collaboration between Westat and NCCD; a new webinar on predictive analytics and child protection; CEO Kathy Park represents NCCD around the country; the 2016 Media for a Just Society Awards call for entries opens. *This link opens slowly; please be patient.

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

Risk assessment is a core practice to promote safer communities and more successful youth.

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

A disposition matrix brings a greater degree of consistency, reliability, and equity to the assessment and decision-making process.

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

While the abstract concept of validity makes sense, actual testing for validity can be challenging. Because validity exists on a continuum, with degrees of less and more valid, we think of some tools as being more valid than others. This means that a test to determine which tools are most or least valid can be useful.

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

Disposition matrices help guide decisions, allow for more effective practice evaluation, and are powerful tools for helping systems achieve their goals.

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

Research has demonstrated that structured decisions lead to better outcomes than those based on worker judgment alone.

| Kristen Johnson, PhD

Recent research suggests that half of all children in the United States have experienced some type of traumatic event that threatens their safety or well-being. Children involved with the child welfare system are particularly vulnerable to trauma. Over the last decade, child welfare agency managers and stakeholders have been pursuing ways to ensure that practice is trauma-informed, i.e., based on research about how trauma affects human beings, and that all children served by the child welfare system are screened and assessed for trauma symptoms. The Minnesota Department of Human Services has supplemented these efforts with analyses of data systematically recorded by social workers to determine whether the likelihood of experiencing trauma symptoms can be estimated. A brief summary of this research can be found here.

| National Council on Crime and Delinquency

In December 2013, The California Endowment funded the National Council on Crime and Delinquency (NCCD) and Third Sector Capital Partners, Inc. to conduct a feasibility study on restorative community conferencing (RCC) to better understand its potential for a Pay for Success (PFS) project. An analysis of available data gathered since 2012 has revealed that of the young people who completed Alameda County’s RCC program, 26.5% were rearrested compared with 45.0% of a matched sample of youth whose cases were processed through the juvenile justice system. Notably, only 11.8% of the RCC youth were subsequently adjudicated delinquent— that is, determined by the court to have committed another delinquent act—compared with 31.4% of the matched sample of youth whose cases were processed through the juvenile justice system. Of participating crime victims, 99% stated they would participate in another RCC. This program also carries significant cost-saving potential, as these lower rates of reoffending combine with a one-time cost of $4,500 per RCC versus $23,000 per year for a youth on probation. With such promising data, NCCD and Third Sector sought to better understand how RCC could be scaled through a PFS project and what capacity building would need to take place for such a project to be feasible. The results of this analysis are detailed in the feasibility report.