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| Evident Change

A new tool guides justice system agencies in creating a more well-rounded service array to meet the needs of the people they serve. Many individuals who have been impacted by the juvenile and/or criminal justice systems have unaddressed needs and traumas. These needs often lead them to—and keep them in—a cycle of justice system involvement. This guide was created to help agencies make strong community and cross‑system connections that will ultimately improve the way people are treated and served.

| Evident Change

As part of a study in the Rio Grande Valley (RGV) area of Texas, Evident Change researchers created a list of resources available to the local community there. They provide services focused on mental health, substance use disorder, emergency shelter for victims of domestic violence, legal advocacy to victims and their families, and more. This resource is available to anyone in need of services or assistance. State and national resources are also included, so help is not limited to the RGV.

Webinar: Pathways Girls Take to and Through the Juvenile Justice System

| NCCD

In this webinar, Dr. Erin Espinosa discusses her latest research on pathways to the juvenile justice system and how gender, mental health system involvement, and trauma affect those pathways.

| Caroline Glesmann | Vanessa Patino Lydia

A new brief in a four-part series related to girls in detention summarizes major findings and is designed to help inform policy that considers girls’ experiences in the juvenile justice system. To create the series—and the research it is based on—NCCD partnered with the Delores Barr Weaver Policy Center in Jacksonville, Florida, with support from the Jessie Ball duPont Fund. This brief, titled “Notes to the Field: Girls and Secure Juvenile Detention, Barriers, Opportunities, and Recommendations,” was developed in part to generate dialogue about the harm of systems and awareness of how resources used to incarcerate girls can be redirected to reduce future system involvement and help break the cycles of poverty and incarceration. All four briefs can be found on our website, here.

| NCCD and the Delores Barr Weaver Policy Center

A brief by NCCD and the Delores Barr Weaver Policy Center examines why girls arrested for domestic violence-related charges in Florida were not consistently assigned to domestic violence respite beds rather than secure detention. “Addressing Barriers to Using Respite Beds for Girls Charged With Domestic Violence” is the second brief by NCCD and the Delores Barr Weaver Policy Center—both supported by the Jessie Ball DuPont fund—about girls in secure detention in Florida. See the first brief here.

| NCCD and the Delores Barr Weaver Policy Center

NCCD has released a brief titled “Girls in Secure Detention in Florida” to provide insight on keeping girls who do not pose a public safety risk out of the juvenile justice system. With support from the Jessie Ball duPont Fund, NCCD partnered with the Delores Barr Weaver Policy Center in Jacksonville, Florida, to produce the brief--one of several publications released on September 25 with an emphasis on the need for prevention and early intervention services and strategies so girls do not become involved in Florida's juvenile justice system.

| Angie M. Wolf, PhD; Andrea Bogie; Estivaliz Castro; Caroline Glesmann; Aishatu Yusuf

This executive summary presents key findings from NCCD’s interviews with 114 gang-involved girls and young women in California from 2012 to 2015. The interviews were part of NCCD’s research into the individual, family, and community factors affecting girls’ experiences with and desistance from gangs and gang-related crime. The goals of NCCD’s study included identifying girls’ reasons for joining gangs, their experiences and activities related to gang involvement, and their motivations and strategies for transitioning away from gangs. The summary also provides recommendations for practitioners, policymakers, and others who are interested in improving outcomes for gang-involved girls.

| Angie M. Wolf, PhD; Caroline Glesmann

NCCD has published a brief that draws on data from NCCD’s interviews with 114 gang-involved girls and young women in California, with a focus on interview participants’ social supports. The interviews were part of NCCD’s research into the individual, family, and community factors affecting girls’ experiences with and desistance from gangs and gang-related crime. The goals of NCCD’s study, conducted from 2012 to 2015, included identifying girls’ reasons for joining gangs, their experiences and activities related to gang involvement, and their motivations and strategies for transitioning away from gangs.

| Estivaliz Castro, Caroline Glesmann

A recent NCCD study examined how and why girls become gang-affiliated and how and why some girls avoid or leave gang activity. The study includes information about addressing the needs of gang-involved/formerly gang-involved girls and recommends that services recognize the girls’ individuality and provide tailored plans that build on their strengths. This PowerPoint presentation summarizes the study.

| NCCD

  

| NCCD

Girls and women represent growing segments of the justice-involved population. Justice-involved girls and women have distinct challenges—such as high levels of trauma, abuse, family issues, substance use, and mental health issues—that need specialized treatment and intervention.

| Caroline Glesmann | Angela Irvine

In order to address the lack of gender-responsive resources for justice-involved girls in Stanislaus County, California, the Prison Law Office in Berkeley partnered with the Stanislaus County Probation Department to develop the Girls Juvenile Justice Initiative. Progress made by the initiative, which began in late 2009, was eventually evaluated by NCCD. This report and executive summary detail the results of this process and outcome evaluation of the initiative, which are meant to inform other counties interested in implementing a gender-responsive approach to meeting girls’ needs in their jurisdictions.